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an israeli soldier, palestinian militant and dozens of civilians. egypt's foreign minister announced this in cairo alongside secretary of state, hillary clinton. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, binyamin netanyahu, confirmed the deal saying that he had agreed to give the cease-fire a chance after speaking with president obama. secretary of state, hillary clinton said the united states and egypt will work together in working toward long-term peace in the middle east. listen. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today if a cease-fire in gaza, and now a broader calm returns. >> the truce is hours after a bomb tore through a bus near israel's defense ministry in tel aviv. the explosion injured two dozen people, hamas leaders praised the attack but did not take responsibility. in gaza, israel struck more than 100 targets including hamas government buildings. officials in the palestinian territory set to strike and killed to dozen including to children. we have coverage from jonathan hunt at the united nations but, first, we go to david lee miller on the ground in southern
to say the agreements with israel regarding the easing of the blockade and with egypt, are very vague. they're being negotiated today. i mean they're an agreement to, to negotiate things about them. which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary, they may be very, very limited, and they may never materialize at all what hamas has gained is first of all a certain diplomatic breakthrough. the amir of qatar went there before this happened. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there the foreign minister of durky and foreign minister of tunisia went there. the prime minister of turkey may go. what hamas has been able to do is bring -- >> break out of its diplomatic cage a little bit. that's the benefit. the other thing is that this is a benefit to the people, the hamas factions in gaza who are fighting an internal power struggle with the external leadership that used to be based in damascus and is now disbursed all over the world. i think for different factions in hamas they've achieved things politically for themselves. the people of gaza may be in a sense o
they do. we should distinguish those two. >> with israel and egypt, the blockade is very vague. they are being negotiated today. there's an agreement to negotiate things about them, which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tra
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
>> eric: we'll be keeping tabs on egypt. >> shannon bream is next, live in washington. >> reporter: fresh protests in egypt, as angry demonstrators clash with police for a third day, after president morsi claims that new rules all but exempt him from balances. the egyptian stock market falls amid fears of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who supp
. all of this is happening and secretary of state clinton has gone to egypt and the west bank helped broker a cease-fire deal. joining us now is michael oren who is is really ambassador to the united states it's great to have you with us today. >> good to be with you too, jenna. jenna: what information you have about the bombing? >> we don't know who is responsible yet, but we do know that hamas is celebrating. giving out candy to children, you can go on youtube and see that hamas supporters saying that they want more israeli body bags. it is about genocidal groups in gaza trying to kill the maximum number of israelis, while we are trying to defend ourselves and reduce the palestinian civilian casualties to the greatest extent that we can. the terrorists are digging in behind us million population. jenna: how has the cease fire talks been going? >> they have not been going well. they are discussing a long-term arrangement to put in a mechanism that prevent hamas from shooting at our population and paralyzing half the country. also stopping iran from smuggling long-range missiles into
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
.s. relationship with egypt. but, first, the former c.i.a. director, general petraeus, today, testified on the deadly attack in benghazi, libya, that killed four americans, including our ambassador. the hearings happened hype closed doors so we do not have recordings of the general's testimony. according to the republican congressman peter king of new york he said from the beginning he believed benghazi was a terrorist attack. the c.i.a.'s talking points also called it terrorism. congressman king added, someone or some group, then, removed the terror reference but it is not clear who did that. >> the original talking points...there were indications finally at the end indications of extremists although there was cheerly evidence to the c.i.a. that it was clear there were pirates involved. susan rice said a spontaneous protest over an anti-islam video sparked the attack but democratic lawmakers say that can be explained. >> what is very clear is that ambassador rice used the talking points the intelligence committee had all signed off on. >>trace: they added that the c.i.a. approved the t
troops are poised at the border, ready to move at gaza. negotiations speer headed by egypt are ongoing, and tonight the united nations secretary-general ban ki-moon arrived in cairo, just hours after egypt's intelligence chief gave an israeli delegation a letter from hamas outlining its conditions for a cease-fire. so far on the israeli side, officials say throw people have died. 68 have been wounded as the result of rocket fire from gaza and in gaza, officials say 104 people have been killed. 860 have been wounded since the conflict began. as for fire power, israel says militants in gaza have fired nearly 1,000 rockets at israel. 570 of them have actually struck israel. another 307 have been intercepted by israel's so-called iron dome defense system. meanwhile, israel carried out 80 strikes today. it has now targeted 1,300 sites in gaza since it began its bombing campaign last wednesday. ben wedeman is in gaza city tonight. ben, how are civilians dealing with this conflict? some of those numbers we hear, 870 people injured are frightening. >> yeah, they're not dealing very well with i
will watch over the next few days. one more thing. it is important to remember egypt is the largest country in the region by population. it clearly has sway over the stability of the region. we have seen that recently in the conflict between hamas or the minutes and the israelis. is it your sense that things are teetering? the whole region seems to teeter with it. >>reporter: when you have such a large crowd in a square with tear gas and rocks being thrown it can be sparked off, bad things can happen, when a few people are killed. it can lead to worst things happening. the other side has shown some real restraint. we saw consolation of a protest movement by the muslim brotherhood today. if you get both sizes demonstrating, that is a recipe for disaster, the other side has held back. >>shepard: so far, steve. thank you very much. >> the important thing here is, remember, it is presidential morsi who helped bring together this truce teen the israelis and hamas and the palestinians. if there are problems with morsi or situations change in egypt and theon is destagized that is as serious as any
in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're prepar
center stage in protests in egypt. the president seizes more power, undermining the country's democratic reform. the turmoil follows a still fragile cease-fire in gaza as the middle east takes another volatile turn. >>> at home, white house critics press for more answers about what went wrong in libya, and whether officials were truthful with the public. >> i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary. >>> my guests this morning weigh in. chairman of the armed services committee carl levin. and chairman of the house homeland security committee, new york republican peter king. then where does america stand on the verge of a second obama term in office? the economy, the fiscal cliff talks, the president's priorities in the next four years. our roundtable is here. david brooks of "the new york times." msnbc's reverend al sharpton. former ceo of hewlett-packard carly fiorina >> historian and film maker ken burns. and nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. and we'l
from egypt. thousands of protesters gathered in tahrir square. 6:15 at night there, many have been chanting step down in reaction to the decree issue by egypt's new president that grants him absolute power. the sixth straight day of protest after morsi issued his decree last thursday. earlier today, the protest turning violent on a street near tahrir square. at least three protesters have been killed since the weekend. nbc live from cairo. and the crowd in tahrir square has been growing, building over the past hours. explain what we're seeing now. >> reporter: well, behind me, probably tens of thousands of egyptians have gathered, been here since the early hours of the morning. in fact, some have been camped out for the past six days. many songs, chants, slogans reminiscent of two years ago, calling on the same things they did two years ago, which is for the president of egypt to step down. they've changed the name, obviously, to reflect egypt's new islamist president. you mentioned that incident today with the tear gas and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot
a plea to allies of the palestinians in particular. the president of egypt, the prime minister of turkey said if you would like to see a two-state solution in the near future, a palestinian state next to israel this has to deescalate now. the president expressing this fear if hamas doesn't stop rocket attacks on to israel's soille he fears left unsaid is israel may retaliate and turn in to a ground war and then the idea of a two-state solution in the peace process will be in the way distant future. obviously the middle east peace process has been on hold for quite sometime. he was asked about this trip will include a visit to myanmar which is also known as burma. he was asked whether it was too soon. a lot of human rights violations taken in burma and he wouldn't have gone if aung san suu kyi didn't think it was right for him to go. a few notes to point out. one is during -- before the press conference he and secretary clinton were visiting a mondastermonastery. they were joking about getting prayers over the fiscal cliff. the president at the press conference was asked what about what k
invasion as a very credible threat and that is done a lot to get the united states and egypt involved in the negotiations. the media work continues. the israelis have dropped leaflets over the gaza strip saying they are coming and prepared to invade and telling people to move to certain areas. at the same time hamaz is sending out text messages to israeli cell phones, specifically to the ones they think are linked to the army saying we will make gaza your graveyard. the tea leaves will finally be able to be read whenever hour for the cease-fire comes or we either have one or very shortly there after that ground offensive could start back to you. jenna: leland thank you so much. we'll talk a little bit about trouble we had at the u.s. embassy in tel-aviv today where a israeli man wielding a knife and an action attacked a security guard. they say the guard fired into the air and was only slightly injured. the suspect is now in custody. there are reports he had some mental health problems. police say political motives are not suspected at this time. jon: as we told you at the top of the
#% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federal level, and they trained 36,000 police. i think they need 150,000 or more than that. we have to go into judges, train the judges, the prosecutors. did you know that a prosecutor here in the united states, if
. >>> next, a discussion on the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia in libya. also the arab spurring countries are in a political transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each country. hosted by the u.s. institute of peace, this is two hours. good morning everyone. i am steve heydemann for the middle east initiatives of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here today at the session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those that rsvped may have been scared off by the false rumors that he would be colin following the panel. that is not the case. so you don't need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you all here with us this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the securities sector within the arab world or over the coming year or so come and buy securities sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all t
continued at this hour in cairo in meetings reportedly taking place involving the prime minister of egypt, the prime minister of turkey as well as the emir trying to come up with a cease-fire there are indications the talks are continuing but here on the ground they plan to implement some kind of ground incursion into gaza if necessary. the military has been offered to draft as many as 57,000 reservists. you can see roads are closed off and see and hear an increased amount of military activity. if there is not a diplomatic solution soon it looks like the violence is going to be ratcheted up. >> heather: david lee miller. thank you. >> gregg: let's take a look. so far 57 rockets have landed inside israel. that doesn't include the 25 rockets that have been intercepted by israel's iron dome. since the started the pillar of defense over 400 rockets and miles have hit hundreds more have been intercepted. how exactly does the iron dome missile defense work? they calculate each rocket's trajectory and only intercepted those that will hate target. this is iron dome to a vast array of sensors to d
of egypt's muslim brotherhood. the party of egyptian president mohammed morsi as he agrees to new talks about over his controversial decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. steve harrigan is streaming live from care row. what can you tell us. >> details of the offices of the muslim brotherhood. attack happened about 70 miles outside of cairo. one of the regional offices. one person killed in the attack, 60 wounded. here in cairo security forces skirmishes continues you can hear sirens and ambulances as well as tear gas is popped off as several thousand protestors are demonstrating to show their unhappiness. >> gregg: will morsi plan on meeting the judges tomorrow and what will they be talking about? >> as you know the judges across the country have threatened to go out on strike over this power grab by the egyptian president. there has been a meeting scheduled for tomorrow between morrisi and the judges no word of a cancellation. it could be an attempt by the egyptian president to reach out to opponents trying to draw black from the violence that has escalated. what we are waitin
identities. the fact that in egypt, the first thing they say is raise your head, you are an ejection, meaning be proud. so the question then is what happened? if this was true for a decade. there was nothing particularly unique about 2007 or 2011. whether there was a major economic crisis in egypt or tunisia. it was extraordinary and i don't think you can just blame it on economics. so the question is why didn't they do it before? i think we have the right answer. political sponsors have always assumed that it is not enough to have angry people to revolt. you have to organize and you have to get a lot of people through the streets and the government has to feel the heat. the fact you have a lot of angry people doesn't quite make it. governments understood that you can can't get people to the streets about organizing. the outline political parties. they kept tabs on social institutions. they put leaders in prison that challenge them. and they were under control. that is why some people are with us for the long haul. what happened over the last couple of years, we have been watching for a decad
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
: in the middle of all of this, it's a very unstable and frankly, unpredictable egypt. and it could be the key. >> yeah. egypt is absolutely a key player in this. right now it's new muslim brotherhood president, morsi, appears to be playing both sides. he has reportedly quietly given the green light to his intelligence services to put pressure on hamas to scale back on those rocket attacks, while publicly he is sending his prime minister to the gaza strip tomorrow in what will clearly be a show of solidarity with the palestinians. now, the egyptian calculation may be that by having their prime minister there, they will cause a pause in the fighting because israel will be reluctant to carry on with the air strikes and launch any kind of ground invasion while such a high ranking egyptian politician is there. that might, of course, help the palestinians. on the other hand, any pause in the fighting also gives a little more time for diplomacy to start work. but watching what egypt's leaders say and do in the next few days is going to be key in what happens next in this very tense situation. shep.
saying there will be a an aments early as tonight. from egypt they are saying israeli aggression will cease. israeli air strikes continue to pound away at the gaza strip. we are at over 110 deaths inside the gaza strip. much of hamas and islamic jihad infrastructure has been damaged as has been their ability to launch rockets. that was the point, to destroy their ability to launch rockets. also to take out jihad military wings which they have done as well. secretary of state hillary clinton will land here in israel. meet with prime minister netanyahu and we have heard a couple high-ranking officials here in israel including the german foreign minister and the unitetheunited nations secretary-general. the actual cease-fire announcement could happen in egypt as the fighting continues here. bill: what have you observed in the past several hours where you are? what's happening on the ground, leland? >> reporter: you would think in the few hours before a cease-fire things would lighten up. not in the middle east. everybody wants to get in as many shots as they can. the israeli militar
that the spring is beneficial, we see that in egypt, this is not necessarily the case. the muslim brotherhood in egypt, the sunni islam that party with different views of regional policy. the egyptian president was in tehran recently for the non-aligned movement meeting and there is a lot of worry at him going to tehran would indicate that iran was isolated as the u.s. had imagined it to be or wanted it to be. more see meeting with iran officials indicated iran is an important regional player. of course what did morrissey during undreamed due? he criticized the regime of bashar al-assad and implicitly criticized the regime for his support of syria. this was an embarrassment for the iranian leadership, to the point that they change translation on television. he criticized syria and every man television set by rain. so trying to save face basically. but we've seen that egypt is not necessarily going to follow iran's policies in the region. in fact, the egyptians have kept their distance from tehran. they have not resumed relations in this a lot of tension in some issues. in addition, turkey eme
's targeting 100 sites across gaza. i know, youf heard this all before. this time it's different. because egypt is not happy with with israel. it's already reached out to president obama and told him, we must put an end to this aggression. sarah seidner is in the region and has the latest for us this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. yes, the number of those who have been killed during this escalation, fighting between gaza and israels had now risen. three people in israel inside an apartment building killed from a rocket attack sent from gaza, from hamas, the government here. we're now learning that 15 people have been killed here in total today, here in gaza, including nine militants, several children and a pregnant woman. what's happening now is off and on, we are hearing air strikes. again and again across the city, across gaza city and along the gaza strip. we know that there have been more than 196 rockets now that have entered into israel from gaza. we were there this morning when we saw ourselves 15 rockets coming in. some of those rockets being knocked down by th
the birthplace of the spring in egypt almost two years ago and once again egyptians are protesting this time trying to hold on to their democracy during a turbulent november. and abc's alex marquardt was on the scene in cairo today. >> reporter: the birthplace of egypt's revolution today once again ringing with calls for the downfall of a dictator. [ speaking a foreign language ] >> reporter: this time it's for this man, president mohammed morsi whom america relies on to be a regional peace broker. it has led to days of bloody clashes. the crowed is chanting erhal, or leave. these are many of the same chants we heard two years ago during the revolution, except that they've substituted mubarak for morsi. egyptians toppled president hosni mubarak, the dictator who ruled for three decades. they then held an historic election and voted in a new president. >> he's like a pharaoh. >> reporter: morsi's office says it is temporary to put egypt on the right track. tonight the wise voices say it's far from fear that will win the showdown, but there are certainly more bloody days ahead on egypt's bumpy
spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiative called teen cancer america. it aims to set up hospitals and medical centers in the strategic areas across the country. see their remarks live beginning at 1 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public atears. weak dies fee you are -- weekdays featuring live coverage of the senate and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> former national security adviser stephen hadley was among the speakers at a recent conference focusing on national security challenges facing the united states. he said the top priority should be getting
of egypt, turkey and qatar, all met, all have varying degrees of influence over hamas, they are trying to broker some type of sees fire. egyptian president said when the meeting was over, they took a break, quoting him, some in of a cease-fire but nothing concrete. it looks like there's a possibility, still, a long way to go. >> harris: very interesting about egypt we'll be talking later inside the fox report about their role in this. the muslim brotherhood has aligned itself with the palestinians in this conflict. let's talk about what might make a sees fire a reality? >> reporter: as -- a cease-fire a reality? >> reporter: there could be a ground incursion"z. currents wht israel wants to make a cease-fire reality is for hamas to stop the rocket attacks that are being launched from gaza. rocket attack fast that hamas is responsible for as well as militant groups. hamas says they want israel to stop so-called targeted assassinations. both groups come to the take with something they want. how much of it is reality they are going to achieve a temporary cease-fire? very uncertain. a few d
. >>> plus, the people of egypt trying to avoid trading one dictator for another. fighting back against a president who gave himself new powers. tonight a potential crisis point as the leader tries to put himself above the law. and how will the u.s. handle this? >>> plus, the chances of winning are ridiculously low. but millions of us are still lining up for a shot at a record powerball jackpot. >> lucky, lucky, lotto win. >> shepard: tonight a look at the actual odds of winning it all. but first from fox this tuesday night, three republican senators now say they cannot support the u.n. ambassador, susan rice, for secretary of state. at least until they get more answers about her comments about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. president obama has not yet even nominated her. but the white house says she is enormously qualified. senators john mccain, lindsey graham and kelly ayotte say they're even more troubled now after meeting with ambassador rice. the attack on libya on september 11 killed the u.s. ambassador, cries stevens and three other americans. five days later, amba
to tel aviv. those were iranian-made missiles, and a big part of the ceasefire was pressure put on egypt to stop the smuggling tunnels. the question is whether iran will continue to keep smuggling weapons in, that's most likely a yes. number three, will the egyptians stop it, and number three, will islamic jihad listen to hamas and stop the rocket fire or will they continue to cause problems here for israel. back to you. gregg: leland vittert, thanks very much. so will the ceasefire hold? what does this mean for hillary clinton and her shuttle diplomacy? general jack keane advised hillary clinton for many, many years, he will join us in just a couple of minutes. >> meanwhile, a trio of u.s. warships sent to the eastern mediterranean area just in case americans need to be evacuated out of israel. the ships were due to return to norfolk, virginia, but their homecoming will be a bit delayed by at least several days. reports say these ships would not play a combat role and would only be used to help americans in that area. they can also serve as floating hospitals if need be. >>> susan rice
, united states giving a bunch of money to egypt but did it take the money and run and turn its back on the united states? >> gretchen: there is a bomb shell. key evidence in the casey anthony trial may have been over looked whompt the heck was the prosecutor. and the bomb shell to convince the jury to convict her and didn't. >> brian: they didn't check firefox. [ mother ] you can't leave the table till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! this monday online only. get the droid razr by motorola in cranberry, free. or a white 7-inch samsung gaxy tab 2, just $99.99. this holiday, get the best deals on the best devices on the best network. exclusively at verizon. with thermacare heatwraps. thermacare works differently. it's the only wrap with patented heat cells that penetrate deep to relax, soothe, and unlock tight muscles. for up to 16 hours of relief, try thermacare. without freshly-made pasta. you could also cut corners by mak
defending their civilian population. the issue would be whether the, the arabs and president mursi in egypt can appoint some sort of horizon for the people of gaza that would allow them to kind of climb down, this is about humanitarian quarters. the people -- government and hamas government in gaza is feeling a little bit more emboldened because of these sort of these visits by these high level delegations from places like qatar and turkey and of course egypt. so, this is about pointing the queue to a future where there's a political process in place, and i think secretary clinton's going to be looking very hard at how do you talk about what happens after this? because the only way people are going to stop, again, if they can stop, there are a lot of people in gaza with rockets and there's going to have to be a real concerted effort to, you know, weed those out, but also to create a political horizon. >> ambassador stuart holliday joining us this morning. thank you, sir, appreciate your time. >> thank you very much. >> ahead on "starting point" this morning, it's considered a key indicator
the fiscal cliff. >>> developing now, new clashes in cairo, egypt today, between protesters and police. the protesters have been demanding that egypt's new president rescind the decree he had last thursday granting him absolute power. tens of thousands of protesters rallied in caikacairo's tahrir square. two of e jim's top courts today suspended their work in protest of president mohamed morsi's decr decree. joining me to talk more about the middle east is ambassador dennis ross, an expert on the region. he was the chief middle east negotiate for president clinton and president bush and served as a special adviser for president obama. he is a mideast analyst. both supporters and opponents are planning more giant protests on friday as well as sad. what's your assessment of the situation and the back and forth between the two sides? >> well, i think what we're seeing is is that this is a new egypt. anybody who thought that president morsi could come in and act like president mubarak and could rule as opposed to govern, there's no doubt that's not the case. there's no doubt he miscalculat
issue is egypt, they are supporting the palestinian tph-s this matter. we are looking at the results of the arab spring. jon: egypt now run by the muslim brotherhood of which hamas is an offshoot. >> that's right. morisi has come out in support of the palestinians. even though the rocket attacks, this violence was initiated by the palestinians. you have the camp david aeu koerbgsdz thaccords, the arab spring. the middle east is a mess. look in iran the centrifuges are still spinning. secretary panetta, and secretary clinton are in asia right now. that pivot, are we pivoting away from the challenges and our interests in the middle east, which is really a mess. jon: you worry we are leaving the israelis high and dry on this one? >> it could be. i don't know exactly what is going on with the administration. they have mad said some of the right things in sue mort of supporting israel. we are reaping the fruits of our labors in the middle east. and our policies in the middle east has been a real failure. if we are shipping through the pacific where are we going to have the planes and tank
that egypt's prime minister plans to visit gaza, gaza, that is, tomorrow. now, don't forget a peace agreement that keeps israel and egypt on good terms. there were real questions about whether that was going to be honored by the new muslim brotherhood president of egypt, and now we find out that this egyptian leader is going to go visit gaza in the midst of rising, escalating tensions between gaza and the israelis. now we want to get back to re land visit earth who is live near the israel/gaza border. so basically, leland, the rockets kept showering into israel, somebody, the head of hamas -- they call him hamas' osama bin laden, basically, took credit for the bloodshed being unleashed in israel. and israel bombed that guy, killed that guy, and now it seems to be escalating from there. >> reporter: exactly, megyn. his assassination happened yesterday around 4 p.m., and hamas came out and said israel has declared war and, quote, opened the gates of hell. and those kinds of words are not things that are thrown around lightly all over the middle east. and definitely as we saw it today, hamas liv
territory. >> can you speak to egypt's role? there was word that egypt's prime minister -- egypt and israel have had this agreement and then in place for years. once mohammed morsi took over as the president, and he was for the muslim brotherhood, many started to question if you will honor that agreement. it is critical to peace in the middle east. your thoughts now that they are getting involved to some extent? >> first to welcome the peace agreement between israel and egypt is for the mutual interest. i think it is the bedrock of stability in this region. it is important that we really keep that in mind and any move on the egyptian side to try to help out in this situation would be looked upon favorably. but first and foremost responsibility for any government is its citizens. we cannot continue with a situation like that. hamas, in a sense, has turned from the whole region. they are really the enemies of peace and we should really try to work together to make sure that the military infrastructure is weekend to such a manner that we will be able to sit down with moderate palestinians in o
we should be thankful for when it comes to the political world. and egypt's muslim brotherhood. the cease-fire deal betweend evf israel and hamas. we have that coming up next. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> more breaking news and developing stories on a brand-new hour on "happening now." >> a new holiday spending bonanza. americans are feeling more confident about our economy. will lead to the great of growth, and what could set us back? >> also, an arrest in a string of murders in new york city connected to one gunman. what we are learning about the man that police in new york city say was poised to strike again. and a large bird crashes through the cockpit plane of this airport. details of the scare in the air for the pilot and passengers. it's all "happening now." >> but first, the cease-fire truce may be fragile, but it appeals to be holding. i am heather childers in for jenna lee. >> and i am rick scott in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed mo
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